Akshay Srivatsan

Contents

  1. Modular Music Player
  2. Raspberry Pi GPU Library
  3. Robotic Orchestra
  4. Theatre Tech
  5. Other

Projects

Modular Music Player

Summary

I made this for the course EE47 (Press Play: Interactive Device Design) at Stanford University during the summer quarter of 2015. This music player differs from normal music players because it consists of multiple independent modules. The "main" module contains the MP3 decoding and processor, and it sends audio and video signals over ports on either side of itself. The speaker and display modules have similar ports on either sides of themselves, and will either use the signals they receive or pass them to the port on the opposite side. This means the modules can be connected in any order.

Demo

Design

I designed this player for people whose needs are constantly changing. Such a person may need his/her MP3 player to be quiet while at work or at a library, but loud while at home. He/she may want a display while playing music at home, but not want to risk damaging it while biking or running. Current MP3 players are "all-or-nothing" – an iPod Classic can't be used while biking because it needs headphones and has a fragile display. A boombox can't be used at work because it is too loud. An MP3 player with tactile buttons may be great for use in a pocket, but would be horrible for use in a kitchen (water/guacamole/whatever would get stuck in the buttons or enter the electronics). Conversely, capacitive buttons are great for the kitchen, but horrible for in-pocket use (how would you tell the buttons apart?). It's impractical to buy a separate MP3 player for each of these uses, so a MP3 player which makes each part easily removable and reattach-able would be much more efficient.

Links


GPU Library

Summary

I made this for the course CS 107E (Computer Systems from the Ground Up) at Stanford University during the winter quarter of 2018. This project contains a graphics library that communicates directly with the VideoCore IV 3D Graphics Processor which is on the BCM2835 SoC on a Raspberry Pi. It also includes demos of a GUI library and two games. This library can draw more than 60 non-trivial 1920x1080 frames per second.

Demo


Robotic Orchestra

Summary

This project was made jointly by Nitya Tarakad and me, based on a previous project by Chris Strong and Saul Woolf, as part of our Applied Science Research class at Menlo School. We made robots which could play multiple instruments (a piano, recorder, and a drum set) and developed software to keep them in sync.

Demo

Links


Theatre Tech

Summary

I worked backstage on many Menlo School Drama Department shows, as well as a few other shows done at Menlo.

Shows

Avenue Q (Fall 2015): Light Board Operator
Miracle Worker (Winter 2016): Lighting Assistant
Dance Concert 2016: Light Board Operator
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (Spring 2017): Setup

The Mystery of Edwin Drood (Fall 2016): Light Board Operator
The Diary of Anne Frank (Winter 2017): Sound Designer and Production Lead
Student-Directed One-Acts: Writer (1 skit), Director (1 skit), and Technical Director (entire show)
Dance Concert 2017: Student Technical Director
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (Spring 2017): Light Board Operator

Links


Other Projects

While the projects above were the biggest, I've worked on tons of smaller projects. A few of them (although this is by no means an exhaustive list) are: